Harrowed Powers

Harrowed Powers
Arcane Protection
Bad Mojo
Berserker
Burrow
Cat Eyes
Charnel Breath
Chill o’ the Grave
Claws
Dark Vision
Dead Man’s Hand
Dead Reckonin’
Death Bond
Death Mask
Devil’s Touch
Etchin’
Eulogy
Evil Eye
Fast as Death
Ferryman’s Fee
Ghost
Hell Beast
Hell Fire
Hell Wind
Infest
Jinx
Luck o’ the Draw
Mad Insight
Mimic
Nightmare
Possession
Reconstruction
Relic
Rigor Mortis
Sicken
Silent as a Corpse
Skull Chucker
Sleep o’ the Dead
Soul Eater
Soul Flight
Speakin’ with the Dead
Spider
Spook
Stitchin’
Trackin’ Teeth
Undead Contortion
Unholy Host
Unholy Reflexes
Varmint Control
Voice o’ the Damned
Wither
Note that all Harrowed powers require the Harrowed template.
Black headers denote powers not yet implemented in GCA.
Harrowed Template

There’s nothing worse to a gunfighter than having to scratch a notch off his pistol. In Deadlands, however, it just might happen. You see, death isn’t always the last you might hear of a really tough hombre.
Strong-willed individuals sometimes come back from the grave. As the Agency and Texas Rangers have learned (sometimes the hard way), these individuals are actually possessed by manitous, evil spirits who use the host’s mind and body to affect the physical world. These undead are called the “Harrowed,” which means “dragged forth from the earth.”


Cost: 168 pts
Advantages:
Doesn’t Breathe
Doesn’t Eat or Drink
Fearlessness 3
High Pain Threshold
Injury Tolerance (mods: Independent Body Parts, No Blood, No Vitals, and Unliving)
Less Sleep 4
Regrowth (mods: Reattachment Only)
Resistant (Metabolic Hazards) 3
Temperature Tolerance 10
Unaging
Unkillable 2 (mods: Achilles’ Heel (Skull injury))
Disadvantages:
Bad Smell
Nightmares (mods: Frequency 12 or less)
Phantom Voices 3
Split Personality (mods: Resist on 12 or less)
Supernatural Feature (mods: Pallor)
Unhealing 1
Unnatural Feature (Death Wound)
Perks:
Deep Sleeper
Sterile
Quirks:
Double Will penalties for staying up late
Needs:
Either “_Secret Harrowed” or “_Open Harrowed”

Arcane Protection

Manitous being the masters of the Hunting Grounds, they can sometimes shirk the effects of other supernatural creatures on earth.
Sometimes.
A Harrowed with arcane protection can force his manitou to negate spells, hexes, and other supernatural attacks. The manitou isn’t always successful, but it usually tries its best, since protecting its host from eldritch attacks usually goes hand-in-hand with keeping its own self alive.
Whenever the hero is a direct target of a spell or other supernatural attack, the hero can attempt to simply ignore it. To do so, the character must be able to take an active defense. If the Harrowed cannot do so, then the character can’t invoke the manitou in time to help stop the enemy spell. Assuming the Harrowed is able to invoke the manitou in time, he can make a Will contest versus the opponent’s spell, adding his level in this ability to the final total.
If the Harrowed is successful, the enemy attack is cast but does not actually affect him. A spell that affects an area may still affect the character as long as he wasn’t directly targeted. It cannot be negated with this power.


Cost: 3/6 pts / Level
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Will, limited to spell resistance only and requires activation)

Bad Mojo

Through their manitous’ connection with the Hunting Grounds, some Harrowed are able to interfere with a huckster’s hex-casting ability. The Harrowed’s manitou talks with the manitous hovering about the Huckster, and the poor hexcaster finds himself wrestling a little harder for his magical powers.
In game terms, the Harrowed spends an action to initiate a contest of Wills with the huckster. If the huckster wins, nothing happens at all.
If the Harrowed succeeds, the huckster might be in for a double helping of trouble. For each level of the power that the Harrowed possesses, the huckster has to draw one extra card whenever he slings his next hex. These extra cards do not count toward the huckster building a hand for the hex, but they do give extra chances for the huckster to draw a Joker and suffer backlash as a result.
Needless to say, this power doesn’t much endear Harrowed to hucksters. More than one huckster has been killed by the effects of this power.
However, the Harrowed can only affect a huckster that he can see. The range is effectively limited only to any huckster in sight.
The Harrowed can affect only one huckster at a time with this power. Also, no matter how many Harrowed in the area might have this power, a huckster can only be affected by one bad mojo at a time.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Berserker

Harrowed characters tend to grow more savage and dangerous as time goes on. That’s just a fact of their torturous existence. Still, at their worst, they’re nowhere near as fierce as the manitou inside them can be.
The manitou has nothing of the decency of humanity to it, only cruel, bestial cunning. With the berserker power, a Harrowed can learn to tap into that manitou’s nature just a bit, becoming a little more brutal and a little less human. This can be useful when a fight turns nasty and the Harrowed feels the need to draw upon the soul of a cold-hearted killer.
When the power is initiated, all of the Harrowed’s physical attributes are all temporarily boosted by two, while all mental attributes are decreased by two. An attribute cannot be decreased below 1 this way.
The altered attributes affect any skill checks, perception checks, and secondary combat stats as well. This physical boost and mental decline make the Harrowed quite a killing machine for the duration of the power, though not much of a conversationalist.
The length the berserker power can be maintained depends upon the Harrowed’s level with the power (2 rounds per level of Berserker). Once that duration is over, the undead’s Traits revert to their normal rankings. The undead suffers 1d6 fatigue from the exertion and cannot use the power again until this fatigue is recovered.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Burrow

Taking a dirt nap can do a lot for a fellow’s affinity for Mother Earth. After all, there’s not many people that actually get to see sunlight again after spending a few days buried six feet under.
A Harrowed with this power can tunnel through the earth with unbelievable speed. She doesn’t dig her way through the muck so much as it moves out of her way by means of professional courtesy. As one who’s likely spent some time sleeping with the worms directly after her original demise, the Harrowed is able to move the very earth out of her underground path by sheer force of will.
Many Harrowed with this power first figure it out when they try clawing their way out of a not-so-shallow grave that they just happen to have found themselves buried in. Instead of having to scratch and dig toward the surface, the dirt just skirts aside for them like an old friend met on the street.
As ways to start your second chance on this old Earth go, it’s not a bad one—given the alternative. Some Harrowed without this power have found themselves trapped in a grave that was made a bit better than the manitou inside them had realized. Needless to say, this makes for some awfully angry manitous. They get out eventually, and they’re ready for blood then.
This isn’t to say that the dirt doesn’t touch the Harrowed. In fact, it clings to them like a long-lost lover. A Harrowed that burrows to the surface is sure to be encrusted with soil and covered with all sorts of tiny creatures that dwell within it: worms, millipedes, insects, and such.
The more powerful a Harrowed is, the faster it can move through the soil and the tougher the kind of earth it can move through. Strangely, however, a Harrowed can never burrow deeper than six feet down (although it can burrow directly up if it happens to be lower than that).
A Harrowed can move at full burrow rate when burrowing through the Earth, but if she does so, she runs the risk of getting lost. Just because she can move through the earth doesn’t mean she can see through it. Every round the Harrowed burrows faster than half burrow movement, she must make an IQ -2 roll or get lost.
If a Harrowed is lost under the earth, it’s up to the GM where she ends up. A burrower’s inner ear tells her which direction is up, but otherwise she’s just lost.
If the Harrowed goes fumbles on her IQ roll, then she doesn’t even know she’s lost. She is definitely going to be in for a big surprise when she resurfaces.
It’s impossible to sprint while burrowing. In fact, simply “running” at full move while burrowing costs 1d6 fatigue per round.
No matter what the Harrowed’s power level, it’s impossible to burrow through anything solid, be it a large boulder, a steel plate, or a wooden wall. Basically, if it ain’t dirt, it ain’t moving.
The basic movement rate while burrowing is 2 per level.
A level-5 burrower, for instance, can move through the dirt at a move of 5 with no penalties — 10 if “running”.


Level 1
Cost: 34 pts
Advantages:
Tunneling Move 1 (can move 2 with penalties and fatigue cost)

Level 2
Cost: 38 pts
Advantages:
Tunneling Move 2 (can move 4 with penalties and fatigue cost)

Level 3
Cost: 43 pts
Advantages:
Tunneling Move 3 (can move 6 with penalties and fatigue cost)

Level 4
Cost: 48 pts
Advantages:
Tunneling Move 4 (can move 8 with penalties and fatigue cost)

Level 5
Cost: 53 pts
Advantages:
Tunneling Move 5 (can move 10 with penalties and fatigue cost)

Cat Eyes

Cat eyes grants an undead character the ability to see things others cannot, even stare directly into the murky depths of a man’s soul (to a certain extent). When used, the Harrowed’s eyes glow slightly, as an animal’s do when they catch the moonlight just right.
The undead actually has to concentrate to use the ability. It is not considered “always on.” This is fine, since otherwise the constant eerie glow in the Harrowed’s eyes would be enough to get the witchhunters preparing themselves a mighty big bonfire.
Harrowed characters with this power should be careful how and when they decide to use it. Sometimes the glowing side-effect can actually show an enemy just where to put his bullet if a Harrowed with cat eyes is trying to sneak up on him in the middle of a dark night.
Level 5 grants Soul Sight. Soul Sight allows the Harrowed to look directly into another’s soul. When activated, he can tell a person’s general inclination, if he’s lying, or if he’s an abomination or Harrowed.


Level 1
Cost: 8 pts
Advantages:
Telescopic Vision 4 (mods: No Targeting)

Level 2
Cost: 18 pts
Advantages:
Infravision
Telescopic Vision 4 (mods: No Targeting)

Level 3
Cost: 27 pts
Advantages:
Infravision
Night Vision 9
Telescopic Vision 4 (mods: No Targeting)

Level 4
Cost: 48 pts
Advantages:
Dark Vision (mods: Color Vision)
Infravision
Telescopic Vision 4 (mods: No Targeting)

Level 5
Cost: 56 pts
Advantages:
Dark Vision (mods: Color Vision)
Detect (Soul Sight) (mods: Analysis Only, Short-Range 1)
Infravision
Telescopic Vision 4 (mods: No Targeting)

Charnel Breath

Most folks don’t believe in supernatural things like the walking dead. Those who do expect that even if the dead do walk, they surely don’t breathe (and they don’t have to if they don’t want to, although it sure comes in handy when trying to talk to someone). Anyone who’s met a Harrowed with this power definitely wishes they didn’t.
Charnel breath is the ability to dredge up all the worst stench of decay in a Harrowed’s body, supernaturally fester it even further in a bare moment, and blow it out all over an unsuspecting target within arm’s reach. The victim suffers damage to his FP as a result, partly from the corrosive effect of the gas on eyes, nasal passages, and windpipe, and partly from the violent retching that it produces. The stench is enough to make even those in the room wrinkle their noses and hold their breaths until a breeze can clear the place of the noxious fumes.
This power can only be used on a victim within an arm’s length of the breather (about 3 feet). Beyond that reach, charnel breath does little more than offend.
The Harrowed’s level with this power determines the penalty to the victim’s HT roll. The amount of failure determines the amount of FP damage that the victim takes.
Note that nonliving beings are immune to this particular power, though they still won’t likely appreciate a ghastly belch in the face.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Chill o’ the Grave

They say the grave is damp and cold. By the use of this power, a Harrowed can radiate that chill from the Hunting Ground through his body, lowering the temperature and increasing the humidity in his general vicinity. The level of the power determines just how large that “vicinity” can be, as shown in detail on the table on the next page.
For each level of power the user possesses, he can lower the local temperature by 5° Fahrenheit. This change occurs at a rate of 5° per minute. At the same time, he can raise the local humidity by 5% per level of power possessed, at a rate of 5% per minute. When control is released, the local temperature and humidity return to normal at the same speed at which they originally changed.
Manipulating the local temperature and humidity with this power allows for some pretty dramatic changes in the weather. When the Harrowed uses the power at lower levels, living creatures in the area feel a disturbing chill and dankness. At higher levels, the user can actually summon up mists and ground fogs. Of course, the GM has the final say as to what effects are possible under the current weather circumstances.
There are two basic purposes for which the Harrowed might use this power.
One is to simply spook other people in the area. A Harrowed trying to impress listeners with a frightening tale might generate a subtle chill to help give them goose bumps. Or a more dramatic Harrowed might be more blatant about creating eerie mists as a sign of his power. This might add a bonus to an attempt to impress or tack a penalty onto an initial fright check.
The other main use of chill o’ the grave is as cover for sneaking about. Again, a mist that builds slowly is not likely to signal itself as a supernatural power, but it can grow thick enough to hide an undead within it (the visibility is about two yards). There’s nothing like using a strange mist to sneak into town—or out.
Additionally, a fog that springs up in bare minutes can provide for a pretty impressive entrance when the Harrowed steps out of it abruptly to confront the object of his visit. If he’s careful with his use of the power, the Harrowed can make the fog fade rather quickly too, making his control over it obvious to even the most skeptical observer.
Using the chill o’ the grave power can be exhausting. It’s not easy to radiate dank. For each minute that the power is maintained, the undead suffers 1 point of FP loss. This includes the time that must be spent to cause the effect in the first place.
In general, the humidity must be near 100% to generate a fog. Also, the temperature must be at least 15° colder than the air outside the Harrowed’s radius of effect. In other words, the conditions must be right for the Harrowed to be able to pull this off. It’s impossible to generate a rolling bank of fog in the middle of the day in Death Valley, but it would be extremely easy to do so in the City of Lost Angels on a mild spring evening.
The Harrowed cannot usually cause rain with this power, since the clouds are too far away to affect. Atop the Rockies, though, this could be possible. In fact, if it’s cold enough, it might even snow.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Claws

Saloon gals can leave vicious scratches down a fellow’s back, but that’s nothing compared to what a Harrowed can do. These claws can go right through a spine like a razor-sharp Bowie knife.
The character’s hands turn into cruel claws at will. The higher the level, the bigger the claws.
The Harrowed can extend or retract the claws by simply thinking about it, and this simple act can pierce even leather gloves (if worn). Keeping them out or in requires absolutely no concentration on the Harrowed’s part.


Level 1
Cost: 4 pts
Advantages:
Claws (Blunt Claws) (mods: Switchable)

Level 2
Cost: 6 pts
Advantages:
Claws (Sharp Claws) (mods: Switchable)

Level 3
Cost: 9 pts
Advantages:
Claws (Talons) (mods: Switchable)

Level 4
Cost: 13 pts
Advantages:
Claws (Long Talons) (mods: Switchable)

Level 5
Cost: 18 pts
Advantages:
Claws (Long Talons) (mods: Switchable, Armor Divisor 2)

Dark Vision (Harrowed)

A Harrowed’s manitou exists sort of halfway between this world and the next, able to view both the Hunting Grounds and this Earth. This kind of double vision might drive a living soul insane, but Harrowed are usually made of tougher stuff.
By stealing a glimpse of the manitou’s sight, an undead can glance into the Hunting Grounds to gain some sort of idea as to how tainted his current locale is.
In order to initiate the power, the Harrowed must sit quietly and enter into a deep trance, entirely oblivious to events in the natural world. The higher the power level, the faster the trance is achieved. Only a wound can rouse the Harrowed from the trance before its duration comes to an end. At the end of this time, the Harrowed may catch a vision of the Hunting Grounds.
Stealing this glimpse is tiring work. Every round spent staring into the maddening Hunting Grounds causes the Harrowed incredible mental strain. This is reflected in the amount of FP taken per round, and depends on the Harrowed’s power level.
The distance of the Harrowed’s power is not sight as any sane person would assume. Instead, due to the strange nature of the Hunting Grounds, the vision’s effective distance is based on the Harrowed’s power level. Objects in the real world, such as walls, do block these visions.
Harrowed must actually be able to gaze into a person’s dark soul or study an object’s presence before he can see its spirit-self.
What can be seen by the vision are basically things like manitous swirling around a powerful huckster, how dark a general location is (representing its fear level), any magical effects on people or objects, or even whether or not a manitou is wriggling around inside of someone. In the latter case, the manitou’s demeanor might even indicate whether or not it is currently controlling its Harrowed host.
Finally, any creature with a Terror Score leaves a dark trail through the spirit world. Up to one hour after an abomination has moved through an area, it leaves a trail of pure taint. A Harrowed with dark vision can follow such trails as long as he maintains his ability.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Dead Man’s Hand

Harrowed with this power can continue to control their own severed limbs for short periods of time, even if they’re out of sight. The Harrowed could cut off his hand and let it run around a room on its own, or give an eyeball to a compadre so the Harrowed can spy on what’s going on when he doesn’t happen to be around.
If a Harrowed attempts to attack with an animated severed limb, he uses his own statistics but he must subtract –4 from the attack roll. The damage from an animated hand, by the way, is half the character’s normal unarmed damage. These limbs are much better at opening jail cells and causing distractions than beating the Hell out of someone.
The undead typically only remove their hands or eyes for use with this power. It just doesn’t make much sense, to slice off your foot and send it after someone.
The duration that the body part can be controlled while separated from the owner’s body depends on the user’s power level. After that, the parts rot like normal dead flesh unless reattached. Only one of the character’s body parts can be manipulated at a time.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Dead Reckonin’

Several of the Harroweds’ powers center upon corpses and graveyards. But what’s a fellow to do when he wants to raise an undead posse, but there just isn’t any sign pointing to the local boot hill? Well, that’s when the dead reckoning power is useful.
Dead reckoning is the ability to sense the direction to the nearest human corpse. It may lead you to the undertaker’s shop or a cemetery or just the site of a recent bush-whacking, or it might even lead you to a walking corpse, whether that be a zombie or even another Harrowed. It all just depends upon what’s closest.
As far as dead reckoning is concerned, it doesn’t matter how far away that nearest corpse is; the power just points a direction. All that matters is that the body still has at least some flesh on its bones. Dead reckoning can’t lock onto bare bones.
Fortunately for the Harrowed, once he arrives at the corpse he sensed, the power can be redirected to point the way to the next nearest corpse. This way, if he doesn’t find exactly what he’s looking for the first time, he can go looking someplace else.
As a Harrowed gains higher levels of ability with this power, he also begins to gain some sense of the distance to the corpse being sensed, and the condition of that corpse.
This power can also come in handy to recognize Harrowed that are posing as living, breathing folks. Assuming the Harrowed is the only corpse nearby, it usually works like a charm. All you’ve got to do is turn it on. If the nearest corpse is a lot farther away than the fellow you’re curious about, then you know he’s not walking around when he should be sleeping with the worms.
If you’ve only got the power at level 1, though, it might take some triangulation to figure out if a cowpoke’s Harrowed or not. After all, if there’s a boot hill off yonder behind him, your hero might be detecting that instead of the target’s well-preserved cadaver.
Picking a Harrowed out of a graveyard, though, is darn near next to impossible. The power is certain to pick up the corpses in the ground rather than the target. Of course, if you’re standing close enough to touch the person in question, then the power should work. Your hero had just better pray that, if the target actually is Harrowed, he’s friendly too.
Not a lot of people would be willing to lay money on that.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Death Bond

Evil creatures often have servants—grunts to do the dirty work that their masters plan. Lots of times, these masters give a special follower some token of power, a sort of down payment on the rewards he will receive when his lord rules over all.
Some Harrowed can make a similar sort of pact with a living person, lending some of their powers to a friend or colleague for a short period of time.
It isn’t a pleasant experience, though. For one thing, Harrowed powers are spooky enough when wielded by a walking corpse. It’s even creepier when a normal, living person uses one. For another thing, the process by which powers are loaned is pretty gruesome on its own, and not everyone is willing to endure it.
To lend Harrowed a power to a living person, the recipient has to drink some of the thick, tarry stuff that passes for blood in the Harrowed. This causes the living person to lose 2 FP from the substance’s nauseating nature. If a cowpoke can manage to gag this stuff down— which is at least a HT-5 check (at least the first few times that he sucks on the Harrowed’s veins)- the foul mixture causes the drinker to lose another 2 FP. This second lost FP can’t be recovered until the power is used and released.
Once the blood is exchanged in this way, the Harrowed relinquishes any one level of one power of her choice, and the living partner receives one level of that power. A Harrowed with 3 levels in cat’s eyes, for instance, could grant his minion 1 level of cat’s eyes, allowing the mortal to see twice as far as normal and add +4 to Visual Perception checks involving seeing distant things. The Harrowed would then only be able to use his own cat’s eye power at level 2.
The loan lasts until the Harrowed decides to reclaim the power (or is killed—again), at which point the recipient loses it automatically.
If a Harrowed loses control to her manitou, that lent power may be lost at the most inopportune time—for the borrower. Imagine being two stories up the side of a building when the manitou decides to take back its spider power, for instance!
The level at which a Harrowed possesses the death bond power determines how many power levels can be loaned out at a time. These power levels can be lent to one person or divided among several, and can come from one power alone, or from various different ones.
For example, an undead with three levels of death bond could loan three levels of the same power to one person, or divide those three levels among two or three people, and so on. Keep in mind, though, that each level loaned requires its own ritual of blood transfer. Note that Harrowed can’t borrow powers in this way.
Also, when a power level is loaned away, the Harrowed loses the use of that level for herself. This power doesn’t allow someone to duplicate another power. The levels are literally taken from the hero and transferred to someone else.
Even the death bond power can be transferred to another person. The minion can then loan out the powers that have been loaned to him. Remember, though, that loaning out death bond also brings down the number of power levels the Harrowed can loan out herself.
If someone with a loaned power is killed, the power returns to the Harrowed who loaned it. In this way, a Harrowed can keep track of her underlings in a crude way. If a loaned-out power comes flowing back to the Harrowed, then she knows that an ill fate has befallen her friend.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Death Mask

One thing about death, it’s usually ugly as sin. And the corpse of a Harrowed comes chock full o’ sin, courtesy of the manitou inside. But there’s a cure for that—at least for the way it looks, if not the manitou itself.
When it comes to the realm of the supernatural, things are seldom as they seem. With this ability, an undead can use the supernatural power of illusion to disguise his true appearance from normal people. This can come in especially handy for a tattered, rotting Harrowed who needs to go into town for supplies. But undead with more experience can even use this power to help disguise themselves as someone else.
Death mask doesn’t physically change the Harrowed’s features, though. It just fools other people into seeing what the undead wants them to believe.
The Harrowed has to concentrate to keep up the illusion, so he suffers a penalty of –2 to all dice rolls while using the power. Also, because the illusion isn’t real, it doesn’t project a reflection, so anyone spotting the undead in a mirror can see him for what he really is.
The undead’s concentration may not be broken when he’s wounded (this is up to the GM, depending on the circumstances). If not, the illusion holds. However, the fact that the Harrowed just took an injury and wasn’t too bothered by it should tip most people off to the fact that the Harrowed is not exactly what he might appear to be.
Remember that most Harrowed don’t really look too dead. They don’t normally need this power to disguise their status as cheaters of death. Most often, a loaded .45 is enough to keep the curious away.
Of course, in the case of Pinkertons, Texas Rangers, and other people who know what they’re looking for, this isn’t always the case. Against such foes, this power can prove invaluable.
Harrowed with the degeneration disad are those most in need of this power. It’s awful hard to stroll into the local saloon if you’ve got a skeletal face and raisins where your eyes once happened to be. It tends to clear a room real fast.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Devil’s Touch

Here’s another trick for wanton destructiveness from the repertoire of the Harrowed. As if it isn’t enough that they can spread decay and disease, some can also make mechanical devices prone to break down or malfunction in their vicinity. This power is called devil’s touch.
Devil’s touch modifies the reliability rolls of a single device used in the Harrowed’s presence, making it more likely to fail. The Harrowed’s power level serves as a die roll modifier, lowering the item’s Malfunction number.
Naturally, this makes mad scientists’ devices more prone to malfunctioning. But the power can also affects any other single device with moving parts in the vicinity—from the spurs on a cowboy’s boots to the revolver in his hand— giving it a temporary increase to the malfunction rating.
The power’s level also determines exactly what the term “vicinity” means in relation to the Harrowed using devil’s touch. When the power is activated, the Harrowed can choose any range up to and including five yards per level.
It doesn’t take much imagination to realize that an undead tinkerer never need worry about running out of work.


Cost: 5 pts / Level
Advantages:
Custom made (based on talents)

Etchin’

Even after meeting with the Grim Reaper, some folks got plenty to say to the world. Sometimes what’s written on their tombstone just ain’t enough.
Telegraphs being what they are in the Weird West, most folks would prefer to rely on alternate means of communication. Harrowed with this power can send a message from beyond death. This may not sound so impressive, considering they’re already up and wandering around, but they can also send it a long ways from where they’re standing.
Basically, the Harrowed can etch a handlettered message in any surface that he’s seen and knows the current location of. Since this makes working with mobile things like the side of a train difficult, most times the Harrowed goes for things like walls, floors, and even headstones.
The maximum distance from the Harrowed to the surface the message can be etched upon is determined by the Harrowed’s level with the power.
Of course, the Harrowed can only write messages in languages that she can read and write. If the Harrowed is illiterate, this is a pretty useless power, although it could be used to draw rough pictograms instead.
The real trick here is that there’s no way to make sure that the intended recipient gets the message. The Harrowed has just got to put the words where she thinks they’re likely to be seen and hope.
The message usually looks like someone scratched it with a knife into the material on which it appears. This can change depending on the material and the effect desired. If used on a wall, it might look like fresh blood. If the message is supposed to show up on glass, it would appear etched. If it materialized on a bit of stone, it would seem carved.
Once sent, the message is permanent, just as if it had been written by the Harrowed’s own hand. It doesn’t disappear unless someone actually makes a successful attempt to obliterate it.
The message can be of any length, but the Harrowed player must actually write the note out on paper by hand. The note is then given to the GM (or to another player if that’s the intended recipient and the message gets to him) who can interpret it as she wishes.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Eulogy

When this cowpoke wants to say a few final words, they’re meant for someone else. And they are final.
The Harrowed player delivers a short speech, talking about the intended victim as if he had just passed away. It can be sweet or vicious, but its purpose must be clear.
The target must be able to hear and understand the Harrowed’s words for the power to work. If it’s not spoken in a language the target understands, it just doesn’t work.
It only works on humans beings too. As much as you might swear that mare could understand you, she’s just not going to really get it.
Once the speech is over, the Harrowed makes a Public Speaking roll contest against the target’s Will. The Harrowed adds +1 to this roll for every level he has with the power.
If the Harrowed gets a success, the target has a heart attack. He must make a HT -6 roll. If he makes it, he loses 3d6 FP (remember, 0 FP results in unconsciousness).
If he fails it, he still loses the 3d6 FP and 2d6 HT (not HP). He also has to make a second HT -6 roll. If he fails this, he dies unless saved by a First Aid -5 roll within 2d6 rounds. If his HT falls below 1, he dies either way. HT lost this way is temporary and is recovered at 1 point per full day of inactive bed rest, assuming the target survives long enough to make it to a bed. Medical care from a physician will not speed up recovery.
This power can only be used once against any particular victim. Even if it entirely fails, it can never be used against that person again.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Evil Eye

Having a Harrowed set its eyes on you is bad enough. Getting vexed by one with the evil eye will likely seal your fate.
This simple curse makes a mortal clumsy, stupid, slow, and usually, dead. Every action roll the target takes suffers a penalty equal to the level of the Harrowed’s power.
Evil eye works only on living humans. Animals, abominations, and other critters can’t be cursed.
The Harrowed may only vex one person at a time. He cannot vex another with his evil eye until he lifts the first curse (which he may do at any time), or the target kicks the bucket.
The target must be able to look into the Harrowed’s evil eye to be vexed. This makes its effective range about 25 yards.


Level 1
Cost: 52 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 55 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 58 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 61 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 64 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Fast as Death

Normally, of course, dead bodies don’t move very fast. They just sort of lie there. The Harrowed break that rule just by being up and moving around. But some can even move with supernatural speed when the need arises. They call it fast as death.
A Harrowed with this power can add extra distance to her movement on any particular action. Any time she decides to take a movement action during a round, she can declare that she’s moving as fast as death.
The Harrowed can then double her movement for that action (and that action only). By doing this on multiple rounds, she can cover a considerable piece of ground in less time than it takes to whistle “Dixie” in Dodge.
Using this power costs a Harrowed FP. The amount is determined by the Harrowed’s level with the power. The higher the power level, the less FP it costs.
A Harrowed can use this power as often as she likes, and even over several rounds. The only limitation is how much FP the Harrowed has left.
And yes, a Harrowed can actually knock the wind out of herself by using this power too liberally. If this should happen (meaning 0 FP), the Harrowed manages to complete her move before collapsing in a heap unconscious.
Of course, the Harrowed is free to push her movement normally in addition to using this power, by sprinting (see B. 354). Those that do can move along at quite a good clip, albeit at a significant cost to FP.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Ferryman’s Fee

Some Harrowed smell like they haven’t touched water for years. With this power, they can make sure they don’t.
The reason they put coins on dead folks’ eyes is so they’ve got something to pay Charon with when they’re bargaining for a ride over the river Styx. The ferryman always does a fine job, but you’ve got to pay his fee.
A Harrowed with this power can put a down payment on his final fare. To activate the power, he lays two coins across each of his eyes. Any coins will do, but copper ones like pennies are traditional—the ferryman works cheap. After all, the dead may not have much on them when they reach the river, but there’s lots of them.
Once this is done, the Harrowed must wait for the coins to be absorbed into her eyes. The amount of time this takes varies with the level of the power. If the Harrowed is interrupted at any time while absorbing the coins, they fall from her eyes, and she must start all over again.
After the coins are fully absorbed, they disappear, melting into the Hunting Grounds. Then the Harrowed can get up, and for as long as she can maintain her concentration, walk across water.
The power level also determines how rough the water can be for the Harrowed to maintain herself above its surface. In any case, really turbulent seas—like the kind you would see during a hurricane—cannot be walked over. The Harrowed’s concentration would surely be shattered by the rolling surfaces on which she was trying to stand.
The Harrowed can even carry things or people across the water. For all practical purposes, the water is solid to the Harrowed (don’t turn this power on if being dropped into a lake from a height!). This means the Harrowed can even carry as much over water as she normally could on land.
The Harrowed also gets as much traction on the water as she would on dirt. If necessary, she could even tow a boat behind her, although she wouldn’t likely be able to move it very fast.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Ghost

Some people seem to have walked through life untouched by anything. Sometimes that continues even after death.
The character and any objects he wears or carries can become insubstantial at will. He can walk through walls and ignore physical attacks (although mental and spiritual ones work fine). Of course, he cannot affect the physical world without materializing—at least temporarily.
A “ghosted” undead is not invisible. He appears just as a solid as ever, right up until somebody tries to grab his shoulder and winds up sticking her hand through his intangible form.
The amount of FP required to remain immaterial depends on the level of the power.


Level 1
Cost: 88 pts
Advantages:
Insubstantiality (mods: Can Carry Objects (Medium Encumbrance), Costs Fatigue (5), Requires Concentrate)

Level 2
Cost: 92 pts
Advantages:
Insubstantiality (mods: Can Carry Objects (Medium Encumbrance), Costs Fatigue (4), Requires Concentrate)

Level 3
Cost: 96 pts
Advantages:
Insubstantiality (mods: Can Carry Objects (Medium Encumbrance), Costs Fatigue (3), Requires Concentrate)

Level 4
Cost: 100 pts
Advantages:
Insubstantiality (mods: Can Carry Objects (Medium Encumbrance), Costs Fatigue (2), Requires Concentrate)

Level 5
Cost: 104 pts
Advantages:
Insubstantiality (mods: Can Carry Objects (Medium Encumbrance), Costs Fatigue (1), Requires Concentrate)

Hell Beast

You already know that animals don’t take kindly to the presence of the Harrowed. Horses shy and buck, rolling their eyes; dogs slink away, growling or howling; cats spit and hiss, their backs arched high; cows get spooked and stampede or just tremble. They all sense instinctively what humans, with all their intelligence, just seem blind to, namely that there’s a big slab of dead meat up walking around and pretending it’s alive.
With all this animal aversion, it can be a might difficult for a Harrowed to get a ride. Some undead take care of that with special powers that let them command animals. (See the varmint control power.) Others just skip the problem altogether by reanimating an animal corpse when they have some need of a critter.
Usually, the Hell beast power is used to make an undead mount so a Harrowed doesn’t have to walk everywhere he goes. But some Harrowed reanimate themselves some Hellish hounds or hawks or pretty much any other sort of critter they might find use for.
Rumor is that one undead bandit even has a Hell ferret he uses to slip in the windows of houses to steal things for him. The animated creatures must be natural animals, however; supernatural critters are far beyond any Harrowed’s ability to raise as undead servants, even at the highest levels of this power.
Animal corpses reanimated with the Hell beast power are basically just critter zombies. No matter what they used to eat when alive, they crave meat now, just like their undead master. And their “life” is closely tied to that of their creator. If the Harrowed who raised them is ever destroyed, they revert to nothing more than corpses themselves. These critters can’t heal any damage they take as zombies, either. Once your Hell horse has been shot all to pieces, it’s time to put it down permanent-like and raise yourself a new one.
The Harrowed can command their Hell beasts with a mere thought, and the creatures hasten to obey—though they do tend to err on the side of destructiveness when there is any leeway in that command. Like other undead, they seem to have an innate hatred of life, and their meat craving drives them to kill whenever they can get away with it.
This isn’t to say that it’s always obvious that any particular Hell beast is undead. If the master can keep the thing’s grisly diet a secret and the critter in some semblance of decent shape, the only other thing that really matters is just how long the critter lay dead before it was “resurrected.”
A dog that was pecked at by vultures before being raised will certainly look horrendous. But if it was brought back only hours after death, most humans couldn’t tell it from a living hound with a really nasty disposition. The only sure-fire sign is that Hell beasts always have glazed eyes and dry noses.
To keep from giving things away, many Harrowed with this power kill an animal themselves then bring it back immediately. It isn’t all that difficult to hide a Hell horse’s craving for fresh meat if the animal itself still looks healthy. But riding a mount into town with its rib bones peeking through its skin and maggots spilling from its dangling entrails is a dead give-away.
Of course, the animal’s strange diet means the Harrowed ought to be careful in his choice of trail companions. After all, it can be difficult to explain to a wagon train of settlers why there’s a cloud of flies centered around your horse’s feedbag.
To bring a critter’s corpse back to life this way, the Harrowed has to breathe into its nostrils, then stroke the critter until it begins breathing on its own. The process takes about a quarter of an hour.
A Harrowed with the Hell beast power can only animate one critter at a time, but it can be of any size or shape that he likes, as long as it’s not supernatural in any way.
The Hell beast’s diet isn’t just for show. If a Hell beast doesn’t get at least a good amount of meat to ingest each day (from about a pound for a dog to around five pounds for a horse) , the thing starts to rot. Each day that it rots, it takes 1 HP damage to every one of its main body parts (torso and each limb). While the progression of the rotting can be halted in its tracks by feeding the creature what it craves, the damage from the rotting cannot be healed.
A Hell beast can’t wander too far from a Harrowed before the Harrowed loses control over it. The actual distance the beast can stray from its master depends on the Harrowed’s level with the power and what kind of orders the creature has.
If a Hell beast somehow finds itself outside the Harrowed’s realm of influence, it’s on its own. The Harrowed can no longer give orders to the beast and has no means to stop it from attacking someone to satisfy its craving for fresh meat.
If the Hell beast returns within the Harrowed’s range, it can be controlled again normally. In the meantime, it’s up to the Harrowed as to whether or not to continue to grant the creature-corpse the means to move around.
Hell beasts like to sneak outside their master’s range, and they take the opportunity to do so at any time they can. Crafty Hell beasts like to leave the Harrowed’s range, commit some acts of mayhem, and then return before the Harrowed is any the wiser.
Hell beasts are not animated by manitous, but they have some semblance of intelligence. This is limited to whatever kind of smarts could have been expected from the creature before death.
The Harrowed can retract the gift of undeath at any time that he likes, no matter if the Hell beast is within range or not. When this happens, the beast instantly goes from being undead to just plain dead.


Level 1
Cost: 7 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Ally with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 8 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Ally with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 9 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Ally with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 10 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Ally with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 11 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Ally with numerous modifiers)

Hell Fire

From Man’s earliest days, fire has been both a source of comfort and an object of fear; it’s a means of both purification and destruction. There’s a reason why flames figure prominently in the Hells of pretty much every religion. Many supernatural beings have a love affair with the destructive power of fire. That can be as true of the Harrowed as of any abomination.
A Harrowed with this power has gained an affinity for fire and perhaps even some level of supernatural control over it. At its lowest levels, the Hell fire power lends its possessor some immunity from damage caused by normal flame. For each level of this power he possesses, he can subtract 2 points of damage from any fire damage he suffers. This protective power is always in effect, even while the undead sleeps or is unconscious.
At higher levels of power, the undead can cause existing flames to ebb or flare at his command. He can even draw heat from the Hunting Grounds and hurl it at hapless (and likely flammable) victims.
Unfortunately, the power also has its negative side effects. For one thing, the possessor develops an unconscious fascination with flames of any kind.
A Harrowed who gains this power is fidgety unless there is a fire somewhere nearby, and he tends to stare blankly into the flame when nothing else holds his attention. He may even forget himself and reach into the fire as if caressing it. At times, firelight seems to flicker deep within his eyes.
By the same token, fire is affected by the moods of the owner of this power. Camp fires, candle flames, and such tend to burn dimmer and slower when he is depressed or weary. When he is energetic—whether angry, happy, or just agitated—they tend to burn brighter and faster, flickering with his agitation. The result is not so obvious as to be immediately apparent to onlookers, but after a while they may begin to notice the changes in flame when the character is around.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Hell Wind

Among some cultures, the phrase, “It’ll be a cold day in Hell,” doesn’t make much sense. That’s because their version of Hell features freezing cold and bitter winds instead of fire and brimstone.
The Hell wind power reflects that chill sort of Hell, rather than a hot one. The power opens a small portal to the Hunting Grounds, high up in the air, through which a whirlwind of deadly cold air invades the world that we like to think of as our own.
Not only does this whirlwind stir up every bit of dust and grit in the local vicinity, it also leaches the heat out of the area, dropping the temperature to just a bit under freezing (assuming it’s not already there). As a result, the air fills with clouds of dirt and stinging ice particles, and living things may suffer damage from the unexpected cold. Characters who pass out in these conditions can freeze to death if the Harrowed maintains the power for long enough.
At higher levels, the undead who summons the Hell wind can ride it around, at least to some extent.
While the whirlwind itself is only a few yards in diameter at the base, the other effects of a Hell wind cover an area with a radius of 10 yards per level of this power that the Harrowed possesses.


Level 1, Icy Wind: Everyone within the local vicinity loses 1 point of FP per round within the Hell wind’s radius and suffers a penalty of –2 to all actions. Radius is 10 yards.
Level 2, Bitter Wind: As above, and any attacks that hit inside the wind inflict an additional 1d6 points of damage due to the stinging cold, while range modifiers occur at half the listed distance. Radius is 20 yards.
Level 3, Blinding Wind: As above, except everyone within the wind’s area of effect suffers –4 to all actions and visibility is limited to 2 yards. Radius is 30 yards.
Level 4, Lifting Wind: As above, and the Harrowed can ride the twister like an elevator, up or down at a speed of 5 yards per combat round, but he cannot take any other actions while concentrating on this. It can also safely catch someone in midair. Radius is 40 yards.
Level 5, Ride the Whirlwind: As above, and the Harrowed can travel cross-country on the back of the twister, at a move of 20 (~40 mph), but he cannot take any other actions while concentrating on this. The move cannot be increased by any means, nor can the Harrowed “sprint” with the whirlwind. Keep in mind that with the visibility so low, the Harrowed often has a hard time seeing exactly where he’s going while riding atop the wild whirlwind. Radius is 50 yards.
* It is important to note that while FP loss does not apply to the Harrowed invoking the wind, additional damage does as well as penalties to actions and visibility / range modifier impacts.


Level 1
Cost: 40 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Innate Attack (Fatigue) with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 45 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Innate Attack (Fatigue) with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 52 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Innate Attack (Fatigue) with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 62 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Innate Attack (Fatigue) and with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 75 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Innate Attack (Fatigue) with numerous modifiers)

Infest

Rattlesnakes, scorpions, and spiders aren’t the only creepy-crawlies a feller has to keep on the lookout for in the rough-and-tumble west. Get enough mosquitoes, horseflies, or ants fired up and they’ll pick you to death just as sure as a rattler’s bite.
Like animals, insects have spirits in the Hunting Grounds as well. The manitous have learned a few tricks to control these creatures as well.
A Harrowed with this power can control swarms of small biting, stinging, insects. The insects aren’t summoned from thin air, so they must be available in the current locale.
To use the power, the Harrowed chooses a target in sight and begins to concentrate. At first a few insects will flock to the target. Within seconds, a few more will come, and then more, until the prey is eventually surrounded by a milling crowd of buzzing insects and lines of biting ants and beetles crawling up his trousers.
Each round (even if the target leaves the Harrowed’s sight), the insects continue gathering until the Harrowed stops concentrating (in fact, they’ll keep attacking the prey even once it’s dead—a good way to dispose of bodies!)
The first round a target is infected has no effect. In the second, he suffers a –1 to all his actions. In the third, he suffers a further –1, and so on, up until the total penalty is –5 in the 6th round of concentration.
At this point, enough insects are swarming over the poor sod to cause damage. Starting in the 7th round, the victim must make a HT roll (don’t forget the –5 modifier) versus the swarm’s collective Strength, as determined by the Harrowed’s power level.
The difference is the amount of damage the victim suffers that round.
The only way for the victim to stop the infestation is to jump in water or kill the Harrowed who’s tormenting him.
It’s a slow death, but it’s a sure one.
One more thing. Being undead, some clever Harrowed with this power actually gather insects and store them in their bellies. That way they always have a supply of creepy-crawlies on hand should they wish to use their power.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Jinx

Some Harrowed court Lady Luck as a mistress. They figure that since they’ve cheated death once, they must be charmed somehow. Of course, most folks would consider that a danged foolish notion. Their situation doesn’t seem all that lucky considering just how ugly and disgusting undeath can be.
Still, even if the little lady doesn’t exactly smile on the Harrowed, she can sometimes be coaxed to frown upon their enemies. Those who cross the undead often find themselves at her less-than-tender mercies.
That’s what the jinx power is all about. Jinx allows a Harrowed to cause his enemies bad luck, straight and simple. The greater the Harrowed’s power level, the worse the luck the hero’s foes suffer.
All uses of the jinx power require a contest of Will rolls against the target of the jinx. If the Harrowed is unsuccessful, his power has no effect on his target and the Harrowed loses 1d6 FP (Fate really doesn’t care to have itself trifled with).
The actual effect of the power is up to the GM, who must make the call depending on the situation and just how powerful the jinx happens to be.
The effects of a jinx don’t just materialize out of thin air, of course. It’s up to the GM to come up with what the jinx does, as well as some kind of rationale for it, however much she might have to stretch to make it realistic. It doesn’t have to be a likely set of circumstances, but it does have to encompass something that’s possible.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Luck o’ the Draw

The flip side of bad mojo is luck o’ the draw. This power is used by those rare Harrowed hucksters to aid their own hex-casting attempts. Again, the Harrowed’s manitou talks to the manitous hovering about, but this time both belong to the same person. The host forces his own demon to convince the other manitous to cooperate. Only a manitou could ever convince another manitou to be more generous than normal with the powers it grants a huckster.
Using the power couldn’t be simpler. The huckster merely casts a hex and draws as many extra cards as he has power levels.
These cards all count toward building a hand for the hex. Sometimes the manitous hanging about can fool even one of their own, however, so a Joker drawn in these extra cards is just as dangerous.


Cost: 5 pts / Level
Advantages:
Custom made (based on talents)

Mad Insight

If your Harrowed’s a mad scientist, her manitou can make her entirely looney.
Just as luck o’ the draw can help a Harrowed huckster with his hex-casting, so can the mad insight power help a Harrowed mad scientist with her inventing. The manitou for the Harrowed side of the character gets together with the manitous hanging around her mad scientist side, to help convey a mad inventive vision more clearly into her mind.
The result can be either inventive genius or sheer insanity, depending upon the mood of the manitous at the moment. There’s simply no predicting how they’re going to react when presented with the latest attempt at a blueprint for a new device.
In game terms, whenever drawing cards for an invention, the mad scientist gains one extra card for each level of this power that she possesses. Note that she must draw these extra cards; once the power has been gained, there is no choice in the matter.
The extra cards make it easier to gain success with the invention, of course, but they also increase the character’s chance of drawing a Joker and gaining a dementia. But what else would you expect from a Harrowed mad scientist?


Cost: 5 pts / Level
Advantages:
Custom made (based on talents)

Mimic

Why just be yourself when you can actually be yourself and so much more?
Since much supernatural power springs from the Hunting Grounds in some form or another, a Harrowed with mimic can force his manitou to duplicate a power he has just witnessed and recast it himself. This includes huckster hexes, other Harrowed powers, coup powers, and even black magic, but not miracles or favors.
To mimic a supernatural ability, the Harrowed must simply beat the original user (whom he has just seen employ the power) in a straight-up contest of Will.
Once that is accomplished, the Harrowed can use his new ability exactly as the being he stole it from. Even his “skill” level in using the power (if there is one) is the same as that of the person with the original power. If a cultist cast a bolt o’ doom with true faith and a power level of 2, the Harrowed uses the same.
Of course, if the ability has a chance of backfiring, such as a huckster’s spell, the Harrowed’s stolen ability may backfire on the Harrowed as well.
In other words, treat the Harrowed character as if he had exactly whatever ability it is that he steals.
Stolen abilities can be held up to a number of hours equal to the Harrowed’s level in the power. When the character wishes to release it, the power is cast out with a round of concentration.
Certain powers that come directly from the Reckoners (usually only granted to particular kinds of abominations) cannot be mimicked. The GM can use this convenient excuse to outlaw stealing certain powers she doesn’t want stolen. Sorry, partner.
Stealing someone else’s thunder is difficult for the manitou inside the Harrowed. Whenever the manitou is forced to pull this particular trick, the spiritual backlash from the Hunting Grounds causes the Harrowed damage. Exactly how much damage is inflicted depends on the host’s mimic power level. This damage is a spiritual blast straight to the guts, so it can harm or even kill a Harrowed.
The damage is suffered when the power is used, not when it is stolen. If the power isn’t used before the time limit expires, it slips through the Harrowed’s fingers. In this case, the Harrowed suffers no damage at all, since the net effect is nil.
When a Harrowed mimics a power, he can only use it once. If he wants to steal it again, the power has to be used in his presence again. He can’t mimic it again from memory.
Powers that friendly characters (like fellow members of the Harrowed’s posse) use can also be mimicked. However, the Harrowed still has to win at a contested Will roll. The friendly character can’t just grant the Harrowed permission to copy the power. It’s always a struggle.


Level 1
Cost: 50 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Leech with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 58 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Leech with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 68 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Leech with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 80 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Leech with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 84 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Leech with numerous modifiers)

Nightmare

Dreams take place in the “Happy” Hunting Grounds. Nightmares take place in the Hunting Grounds, and there isn’t anything “happy” about them.
One of the manitous’ duties in the spirit world is to torment dreamers. A Harrowed who forces his demon to give him this power can use these dark dreams to trouble a living mind. With enough practice, he can even deliver specific images to a victim.
For the power to work, the undead has to lock eyes with the intended victim for a bare instant, just long enough to make a contest of Will roll. If the Harrowed succeeds, the nightmare works. Otherwise, the Harrowed cannot attempt to use his power on this victim again until he has slept. The target is none the wiser nor worse for wear, however.
When the power works, the victim doesn’t actually realize what has happened. There is just a moment of meeting a stranger’s stare, an instant of strange uneasiness, and then things return to normal—until the nightmares start, that is.
At lower levels of the power, the undead simply inflicts a case of night terrors on the chosen target. As his power level increases, the nightmares become worse and worse until they can actually be inflicted in the middle of the day on wide-awake victims.
In such cases, the message is transmitted immediately, consuming the target’s complete attention for a single action or longer if not in a combat situation. Of course, the corresponding nightmares don’t take place until the victim beds down for the night.
The Harrowed can also appear in the sent nightmare or vision and deliver a message. The undead doesn’t really join in the nightmare, though. Rather, in the moment of eye contact, he plants an image that works its way into the dream or vision on its own at an appropriate moment.
In game terms, the Harrowed player describes to the GM how the undead’s image appears in the dream, and she explains the intended message. The message can include all sorts of special effects as well, certainly more than just a floating head spitting out some words.
The GM decides how the victim reacts, based upon the individual’s personality and the image and message described.
Naturally, an undead can’t just go around planting nightmares in everyone he meets. For one thing, people are bound to start talking, and once they begin comparing notes and find that the same hombre is appearing in all their dreams, that Harrowed is liable to find a lynch mob looking for him. For another, the power can be used only once per day.
The Harrowed can use this power to send messages to friendly sorts too, but no matter what the intentions may be, the messages are always accompanied by the nightmare. The Harrowed can inflict lesser nightmares if he likes, but he is then restricted to sending shorter messages.


Level 1, Restless Night: Inflict a one-time instance of Nightmares (no roll) on a victim.
Level 2, Bad Dreams: Plague a victim with Nightmares (no roll) for 2d6 nights.
Level 3, Recurring Nightmare: As above, and visit the victim’s nightmare to deliver a message once during that period.
Level 4, Daymare: Transmit a waking Nightmare (no roll) by means of a daydream, causing an Fright Check -2 and loss of sleep for one night. The Harrowed may deliver a message in that vision.
Level 5, Waking Terror: Transmit a waking Nightmare (no roll) by means of a daydream, causing a Fright Check -5. If the roll is failed, the victim also suffers from ongoing nightmares as above until he complies with any orders given to him in the vision the undead delivers.


Level 1
Cost: 25 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 29 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 35 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 48 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 65 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Affliction with numerous modifiers)

Possession

Some people are so filled with empathy they can’t bear to see someone else suffering. Then there are those villainous souls who view other people as mere objects to be used and then discarded like burnt beans. Harrowed of this type are prime candidates for developing the possession power.
This power doesn’t merely force a course of action upon the victim. It replaces the victim’s personality with that of the possessing undead. The original personality is repressed, and the new one completely controls the possessed body. Memories and skills of the possessed are not available to the possessor. Also, all dice rolls by a Harrowed possessing someone suffer a penalty of –4 due to clumsiness with the foreign body. This penalty is reduced by 1 point each week the Harrowed spends “attuning” himself to a particular body.
When the possession is initiated, the Harrowed and his victim make an opposed contest of Will. The Harrowed adds his level with this power to his roll. If the Harrowed wins, the victim is possessed until control is relinquished. If the victim wins, the Harrowed can never again try to possess that person.
Before a possession can be initiated, the Harrowed must actually enter the victim’s body. This must be done by means of the soul flight power.
Undead with 3 or more levels of possession have a different option for entering the victim’s body. They can sever one of their own body parts—a hand or an eye—and force it down the victim’s throat. That physical presence is then enough for them to attempt possession of the victim, and they can actually maintain control of their own body and the victim’s at the same time, although with a –2 penalty to all actions attempted by either (or any) of the bodies.
Theoretically, an undead could possess up to four bodies this way—one for each eye, and one for each hand—but each possession attempt would suffer the cumulative penalties of the previous possessions. Of course, the mutilated original body won’t be a lot of fun at shindigs either.
As a final note, Harrowed with this power should beware the exorcist. An exorcism can drive his spirit out. This doesn’t put the Harrowed to rest though, as his spirit can still flee back to its own body.
For a merged possessor (one that rammed a hand or eye down some poor sodbuster’s throat), this means the appendage is coughed out of the host where it will likely be burned if caught.
If the possessor used soul flight to get into the host, then the spirit is kicked out. When this happens, the Harrowed’s concentration is considered broken, and his spirit returns to his own body right away.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Reconstruction

Even for the undead, time heals all wounds. Those Harrowed pressed for time can use the stitchin’ power to heal more quickly, but sometimes healing just plain isn’t enough for the job at hand (so to speak).
Even stitchin’ won’t restore a missing arm or eye. For jobs like that, you need reconstruction.
The time it takes to reconstruct a missing body part depends on its size and the undead’s level in this power. Each pound of flesh (or portion thereof) to be reconstructed requires one “unit” of time. The unit of time can range from one action to one week, as listed on the table below.
For example, a Harrowed with level 3 in this power could regrow a missing hand (assuming it was roughly one pound) in 3 months. A missing arm could require over three years of that Harrowed’s time. An entire body (neck down) would take a lot longer.
This reconstruction requires energy, of course. The meat still has to come from somewhere, so the Harrowed must eat a pound of raw meat for every pound he needs to regrow. The Harrowed can absorb this, even if it doesn’t have a belly.


Level 1
Cost: 24 pts
Advantages:
Regrowth (Requires raw meat, Takes Extra Time x4)

Level 2
Cost: 28 pts
Advantages:
Regrowth (Requires raw meat, Takes Extra Time x2)

Level 3
Cost: 32 pts
Advantages:
Regrowth (Requires raw meat)

Level 4
Cost: 48 pts
Advantages:
Regrowth (Requires raw meat, Reduced Time x1/4)

Level 5
Cost: 64 pts
Advantages:
Regrowth (Requires raw meat, Reduced Time x1/16)

Relic

Some folks invest more than money in the equipment they use. Some of them put a little piece of their soul into their favorite belongings as well.
A relic is just that—an item charged with supernatural energy. These come into being when they are bound closely to an event of momentous importance. The death of a hero and her subsequent resurrection as a Harrowed is frequently more than enough cause to give rise to a relic.
This isn’t really a power so much as a bond with a magical item of some sort. These items are simply part and parcel of the hero they once belonged to. A gunslinger’s trademark pistol is just as much a part of his life as a Georgian’s distinctive Southern drawl or a huckster’s curiosity for the unknown.
Only highly prized items can become relics. If a gunman uses different weapons all the time, it isn’t likely one would become a relic. A gunfighter who used nothing but his prized Buntline, however, is due for an upgrade to his favorite shooting iron should he come back from the grave.
The exact power of the relic is always up to the GM. There’s no way in Hell we could come up with a chart that could cover every possibility, so we’re leaving it up to you and your GM’s imaginations.
As your hero gains levels in this power, his relic becomes more and more powerful, useful, or helpful as well. Again, the GM must determine exactly what that means, but here are a few pointers.
First, a relic sometimes merely mimics another power, spell, or ability. If it resembles another Harrowed power, the relic’s power level would correspond to the levels of the imitated power. If your gaucho is a master of the whip, for example, she may come back to find her trusted weapon now allows her to use the soul eater power.
Gunslingers and their prized weapons are also good targets for this power. Each level might add another die of damage to bullets fired from the favored gun. Or the power might add accuracy in the form of pluses to hit.
Not all relics need be weapons. A Harrowed muckraker with an Epitaph camera may simply find that it can now take better, faster pictures. Or perhaps it sees more than the human eye, and when the pictures develop, there is some clue as to the muckraker’s future.
For a blessed, maybe her family bible now adds bonuses to any miracles she casts. Or maybe it acts as a permanent protection to all those within a few yards.
A mad scientist might find that the old tool box his father gave him is irreplaceable. In fact, it adds bonuses to his tinkerin’ rolls equal to its power level.
The possibilities really are limitless. If you have a neat idea for your Harrowed’s relic, talk it over with your GM. Together, the two of you should be able to come up with something that is powerful and useful, but still balanced enough that it doesn’t ruin the campaign and, more importantly, overshadow your character.
Relics created with this power don’t usually have a taint unless they were used in some decidedly evil way.
The real drawback with relics is that they can be taken away from their owners. If that Harrowed’s Buntline is stolen, it’s gone, along with the Harrowed’s access to its powers.
Worse yet, a Harrowed’s relic can be used against him. For some strange reason, a relic can always kill the person it was empowered by. A pistol that shot its own Harrowed maker in the gut, for instance, could kill him again even though it’s not a head shot.
Such is the way of the mad Hunting Grounds where these awesome artifacts were reforged.
Also, relics, being supernatural in nature, can hurt any Harrowed normally. The relic doesn’t even have to literally make contact with a Harrowed to do damage, though, as long as the relic is closely involved in the attack. For instance, bullets fired from a gun relic would be made supernatural by the nature of the weapon firing them, and they’d hurt a Harrowed just like a regular slug would injure the average cowpoke.
If the relic is ever truly destroyed (not just lost or stolen), then the GM can permit the Harrowed to work on recreating that relic. The Harrowed has to have something nearly identical to the destroyed relic to start with. Then he has to use it whenever the opportunity arises (pretty much constantly) until it starts to absorb powers from the undead’s manitou.
This process can take up to a month per level of the power to be instilled in the object. Again, the length of the process is really up to the GM. If the Harrowed is involved in all sorts of adventures in which he uses the item, then the time should be cut a great deal shorter.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Rigor Mortis

With this cruel power, an undead can inflict terrible pain upon a living victim, possibly resulting even in death. The Harrowed has to grasp bare skin for the power to take effect, which means succeeding at an opposed grappling check, with a called shot modifier appropriate to the area being attacked with the power.
Normally, people keep pretty well covered up in the Weird West, what with gritty winds, baking sun, and all. So most of the time, the undead suffers a penalty for having to target the intended victim’s head or hand. Because the target is being grappled rather than merely struck, the attack itself does no damage to the target. Not that this matters much; the power itself is nasty enough to make up for it.
When the power is used at low levels, the undead’s touch merely causes severe muscle cramps to the affected area. The location being grasped spasms and is rendered useless for a short while. At higher power levels, this spasming affects the entire body at once. At its highest level, the rigor mortis power can even induce a fatal heart attack.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Sicken

One of the best things about being Harrowed is that the Harrowed never has to worry about many niggling things that might have affected her body while she was alive: allergies, colds, viruses, and the like. The only time anyone ever sees a Harrowed sneeze is just for fun, and when one blows his nose, it might even come loose in his hand.
Still, just because a Harrowed can’t get sick doesn’t mean she can’t carry the disease around in her belly or her head. Of course, to become a carrier of an illness, the Harrowed must first find someone or something that’s already got the illness and is still contagious. This can be more difficult than it sounds, but determined Harrowed with this power often haunt the local hospitals until they manage to find someone afflicted with some dread disease they’d like to inflict upon someone else.
To pick up a disease, all the Harrowed has to do is touch someone who already has the sickness. Holding on to it and transmitting it are two other things.
Since the Harrowed is already long past being a fertile ground for most kinds of sickness, she can only hold onto an illness for so much time. The higher the Harrowed’s power level, the longer she can house the disease.
Harrowed with the sicken power can command the disease to attack other people, as long as they’re within the Harrowed’s reach. To transmit the disease, the undead must touch the target, which normally requires a successful unarmed attack roll or a grapple check, at least in combat. In other situations, the Harrowed can be a lot more subtle about touching the target. A simple handshake would suffice.
The effect the disease has on the victim depends upon what it happens to be. This is entirely up to the GM as to the illness’ symptoms and duration. After all, the GM has to present the Harrowed with the disease in the first place, so it shouldn’t be much of a surprise to the GM exactly how the illness works.
Once contact has been made, the Harrowed must make a Will roll against the target’s HT. If the Harrowed wins, the target catches the illness. The victim doesn’t just instantly fall ill, for sure. The disease first has to incubate and then run its course.
It may be several days before the victim actually begins to feel any symptoms, and when he does he very likely isn’t able to determine exactly where he picked up the illness. After all, he probably comes into contact with several people every day—or he might just have picked it up from the very air.
It’s possible for the Harrowed to carry more than one disease at a time. She can have up to one illness for every level of sicken that she has. However, the Harrowed can only carry one mortal disease at a time, no matter how many levels of this power she may have. Additionally, mortal diseases (being already so much closer to death themselves) expire after only a quarter of the normal time.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Silent as a Corpse

The dead are awfully quiet folks. When you do hear them, it’s often the last sound you’ll ever hear.
Moving silently over the earth is easy for a Harrowed with this power. As long as his feet are in contact with dirt, he can move without making a sound. This even works while he’s wearing normal footwear like boots and the like. If he’s got a couple of tin buckets on his stompers, though, he’s plumb out of luck.
In game terms, the Harrowed gets a bonus to his stealth roll while using this power. The bonus to the undead’s stealth roll is equal to twice his power level.
Silent as a corpse won’t work on floors, wood, or even stone—only dirt. Fortunately, in the Weird West, most everything that’s not actually inside of a building is covered in the stuff.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Skull Chucker

There’s more than one way to get “a head” in the land of the dead.
Depending on the level, the undead can cast bones with supernatural force strong enough to kill. The exact effects depend on the Harrowed’s power level.
In all cases, thrown bones use the Harrowed’s Throwing skill, and they have a range increment of 10.
Bones don’t appear out of thin air. The Harrowed has to supply them somehow. A few twisted souls with the reconstruction power have even hurled their own bones at their foes, knowing they could replace them later (skulls excepted for obvious reasons).


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Sleep o’ the Dead

Manitous, being the demons of dreams, have something of a talent for getting mortals to sleep.
Harrowed with this power can tap into the manitous’ abilities to send a victim straight to the Land o’ Nod with a single touch to the forehead. Even Harrowed and other undead who still have something of their mortal soul inside are affected.
Such a power can make for a quick way to end a fight, and without much in the way of bloodshed. At least until the Harrowed gets around to having his way with the sleeping soon-to-be victim.
Taking a snooze while dealing with a manitou-infested corpse isn’t the best way to reach retirement age. Sure, it’s not exactly fair to blow away someone in their sleep, but manitous have never been known for their sterling sportsmanship. That’s not likely to change real soon.
If the target resists being touched, the undead must make a called shot to the head with an unarmed attack roll. This attack can do damage as normal, if the Harrowed wishes (talk about knocking someone out with a single blow), or she may decide to make the attack just a simple touch.
As the victim is touched, he and the Harrowed must make an opposed HT versus Will roll. The undead agent of slumber may add his power level to this roll.
If the target’s HT result ties or is higher than the Harrowed’s Will roll, the target resists and there is no effect.
If, on the other hand, the Harrowed’s Will total is higher than the victim’s HT roll, the victim falls to sleep immediately. He will not wake for hours unless he suffers some sort of physical pain (of the non-fatal kind—otherwise the issue of when the victim might wake up again is most likely academic) or is violently roused by means of shaking or slapping. Otherwise, the victim remains asleep for a total number of hours equal to the number by which he failed the contest.


Level 1
Cost: 20 pts
Advantages:
Affliction (Sleep o’ the Dead) (Contact Agent, Incapacitation: Sleep, Melee
        Attack: Reach C, Reliable +1)

Level 2
Cost: 20 pts
Advantages:
Affliction (Sleep o’ the Dead) (Contact Agent, Incapacitation: Sleep, Melee
        Attack: Reach C, Reliable +2)

Level 3
Cost: 21 pts
Advantages:
Affliction (Sleep o’ the Dead) (Contact Agent, Incapacitation: Sleep, Melee
        Attack: Reach C, Reliable +3)

Level 4
Cost: 21 pts
Advantages:
Affliction (Sleep o’ the Dead) (Contact Agent, Incapacitation: Sleep, Melee
        Attack: Reach C, Reliable +4)

Level 5
Cost: 22 pts
Advantages:
Affliction (Sleep o’ the Dead) (Contact Agent, Incapacitation: Sleep, Melee
        Attack: Reach C, Reliable +5)

Soul Eater

Soul eater is one of the undead’s cruelest weapons. The Harrowed grasps her victim by the throat and squeezes as if trying to choke him. In a heartbeat, the victim’s life force is drawn from his body and consumed by the Harrowed’s hungry manitou.
A soul eating undead must first make a successful grapple against the target, with a hit location of throat. When she does, she has the victim by the throat and can begin to drain out his life force.
Performing the actual draining is an opposed Will roll between the Harrowed and the victim. (If the manitou is in charge, use the manitou’s Will in place of the Harrowed’s.)
If the Harrowed is successful, the difference between the two Will rolls is the amount of HP the Harrowed drains if successful. Otherwise, nothing happens.
The Harrowed can use the stolen life force to revitalize herself in some way. As her skill in the power grows, she has more options to choose from. The amount of HP the power steals is determined by the level of the power the Harrowed is using.
The Harrowed can never hold more HP that she normally has (she can’t have more HP than her HP statistic). She can still steal HP, though, even if she doesn’t strictly speaking need it for herself at all.
Excess stolen HP fades away immediately and cannot be stored for later use. The Harrowed can keep stealing HP after a victim reaches negative HP, right up until the hapless sodbuster dies.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Soul Flight

Death has a way of detaching a person’s spirit from her body—permanently. After a Harrowed manages to recover her spirit, she can sometimes let it loose again, but this time under some kind of control.
By means of this power, an undead can loose her spirit from her body and briefly travel the world as a spirit.
Soul flight is useful for scouting and spying, but for very little else. The soul of the Harrowed is completely invisible and intangible during this travel, and it cannot affect the real world in any way. It can pass through solids, however, and can hear and see just fine. With the exception of the possession power, other powers, spells, and abilities are lost while the undead is in this form.
Still, two Harrowed engaged in soul flight can see and speak with each other, although they can’t affect each other in any other way. That makes the power potentially useful as a means of long-distance communication if a time and meeting place is coordinated ahead of time.
The danger of soul flight is that the body and mind of the Harrowed are unprotected while his soul is away. Others can destroy the body if they can find it, but worse, the manitou has a prime opportunity to take control while the human host is away.
If the manitou decides to take control of the Harrowed’s body while he’s gone, there’s nothing he can do about it. Don’t bother making a Dominion check.
The speed of a detached soul is 40. The level of the power determines how long the soul can stay apart from its normal resting place before it’s drawn back.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Speakin’ with the Dead

Some Harrowed find it possible to speak even with the truly dead. They say that, after death, the memories a person has linger on inside his carcass, slowly decaying as the body’s flesh rots away.
Questioning the dead, then, is more like browsing through a book than actually talking with a person. The information you seek may be in there somewhere, but who knows what page it’s on. And considering that the book is rotting away as you read, who knows how much longer that page is going to be legible.
When a Harrowed questions the dead, no one else but another undead can hear the replies. To these damned souls, a dead voice sounds whispery and dry, sad and forgetful, as if every answer is an unimaginable effort.
To successfully question a corpse, a Harrowed must make an opposed test of his Will against the memories within that body. In game terms, this is handled just like an opposed Will test, with a random card drawn to represent the corpse’s Will (unless the GM knows the corpse’s Will). The Harrowed’s power level determines just how old the corpse can be and still be questioned.
Success means the questioner can gain one piece of information or the answer to one specific question. Each raise garners one more piece of information.
Failure means the particular memories the Harrowed was after are already lost. He cannot ask questions pertaining to this subject again until he gains a new level in this power. He could ask other questions that get to the answer he’s looking for, however.
The GM determines just what constitutes a piece of information, based upon the current circumstances. But keep in mind that the dead don’t volunteer much of anything, and they don’t really like to answer questions.
Using this power requires considerable concentration. While questioning a corpse, a Harrowed cannot do much of anything else. In order to hear the answer he seeks, the Harrowed needs silence in the area as well. (Unfortunately, this means that a body can’t be questioned in a cemetery, because the rustling voices of the other dead make concentration impossible.) The inquisitor will have to dig the body up and cart it elsewhere.
The time required to do the questioning depends upon the Harrowed’s power level and how long the body has been dead. Normally, a Harrowed must devote a full hour to the process for each piece of information to be gained. For each level of power the Harrowed has above that necessary for the condition of the corpse, the time is divided in half.
For example, a Harrowed with three levels of this power could gain one answer per hour from a body dead more than a week but less than a month.
A Harrowed may try to question dead beyond his normal ability, but it’s difficult. First, the corpse’s Will total is raised by +4. Second, and more importantly, the answer is even more vague and enigmatic than usual, being pieced together from mere fragments.
There are some problems inherent in possessing this power. For one thing, any Harrowed with this ability is constantly aware of the whispering voices of any dead in the vicinity. Passing a cemetery or crossing an old battlefield can be downright creepy. This makes it impossible for the Harrowed to rest in such a location.
There are also some serious dangers involved with questioning the dead. (But then again, the Harrowed are already walking on the dark side of existence.)
First, the living react really poorly to people digging up their friends and relatives for what they might view as some sort of supernatural ceremony. They tend to get violent about such things.
Second, nearby manitous sometimes enter a body when it’s being questioned and pretend to be the memories of that person. Unless the questioner has some sort of way of seeing these manitous, he may be fooled into following false information. The GM will be especially prone to pull this little stunt if you fumble on your Will roll.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Spider

This eerie power allows a Harrowed to cling to walls and ceilings like a spider. The ability requires concentration, so while using it, the undead must spend FP to maintain it and complete any complex actions. Still, it can be extremely useful when a rope or ladder isn’t handy, or when the character wants to hide, and the only out-of-sight spot is on the ceiling.
A Harrowed high on a wall or ceiling should be careful not to start a fight. If she suffers an injury, her concentration is instantly broken, and then she’s got to contend with falling (and landing) as well.
The level of the spider power determines how much weight the undead can bear without losing hold of the surface and falling. The Harrowed can always support his own weight, plus normal clothing and a personal weapon or two.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Spook

This power gives a Harrowed’s target a glimpse into the twisted corridors of the cadaver’s dark soul.
It ain’t a pretty sight.
The Harrowed draws upon the power of the manitou within to add a creepy element to her voice, appearance, and sheer presence when interacting with someone the Harrowed is trying to impress. This is an opposed test of wills between the Harrowed’s Will (or Intimidation skill) plus the level of this power and the target’s Will.
Besides the normal test of wills results, a target who loses this contest must also roll on the Fright Check Table (see B. 360). The level of the Harrowed’s power determines the number of dice the victim must roll on the Fright Check Table rather than the usual 3d6.


Level 1
Cost: 24 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Terror with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 32 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Terror with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 40 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Terror with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 48 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Terror with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 56 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Terror with numerous modifiers)

Stitchin’

Undead can heal themselves faster than ordinary folks. The manitous inside them draw supernatural energy from the air around them to stitch up their holes and keep them looking awful pretty. As pretty as a warmed-over, strutting corpse can get, anyway.
Stitchin’ allows undead to regenerate their wounds even faster than the Harrowed normally can. The rate at which they do so depends on the level of the power.
This power can even be used to reattach severed limbs and other pieces of an hombre’s body. The only trick is that the Harrowed has to be able to lay hands (so to speak) on the missing piece and hold it to his body until it heals on to his cadaver. Most Harrowed use stitches to hold themselves together until then.


Level 1
Cost: 10 pts
Advantages:
Regeneration (1HP/12Hr)

Level 2
Cost: 15 pts
Advantages:
Regeneration (1HP/6Hr)

Level 3
Cost: 20 pts
Advantages:
Regeneration (1HP/3Hr)

Level 4
Cost: 25 pts
Advantages:
Regeneration (1HP/Hr)

Level 5
Cost: 40pts
Advantages:
Regeneration (1HP/10Min)

Trackin’ Teeth

The fact is that when you’re dead, you sometimes have a tendency to lose body parts. Heck, some Harrowed would lose their heads if they weren’t stitched to their necks with piano wire.
A character with this power can keep track of every one of his body parts, whether they’re attached to the rest of his cadaver or not. This is particularly useful if he’s been detached from a substantial part of himself and wants it back.
Clever Harrowed have found other uses for this power, from which comes the cryptic name. If the cadaver wishes, he can plant a substantial piece of himself in or on a thing or person and use this ability as a crude tracking device.
By “substantial,” we mean a portion of your body that includes a chunk of bone, not something comparatively insubstantial like hair or a bit of rotting flesh. The most accessible pieces of bone available to any Harrowed are found framing his tongue, and this is what they usually use.
After all, you’ve got 32 teeth, and you’re hardly going to miss one of them. With dental hygiene being what it is in the Weird West, few people are going to pay any attention to a cowpoke who’s missing a few of his ivories. He’d be more rare if he had them all where they rightly belonged. With this in mind, of course, many Harrowed may not have 32 teeth to start with, having lost a few in their living days.
The level of the power determines how far away from the Harrowed the missing piece can be and still be tracked. If the piece ever moves out of range, the Harrowed loses track of it, but he can pick it up again if the piece returns within his range.
Once the piece is removed from the Harrowed, it immediately begins to rot. This is another reason bone must be used. Fleshy bits tend to fall apart a bit too quickly, and the smell of rotting meat can be a quick tip-off to anyone the piece is supposed to be hidden from. The level also determines how many pieces the Harrowed can track at a time. If he likes, the Harrowed can abandon a piece at any time he wants. If it’s within his range at this time, he cannot sense it.
However, the Harrowed can try to pick an abandoned piece up again later if he likes, he’s under his total piece limit, and the piece is within range. To do so, he must make a Will check with a range penalty assessed by the Long-Distance Modifiers (page 241 of Basic). Trying to pick up a lost piece that’s 100 miles away, for instance, would result in a -6 penalty applied to the Will roll (assuming it was still within the Harrowed’s range).
If the Harrowed fails, he can try to lock onto the same piece again only after 24 hours have passed. He can try to pick up as many pieces as he likes without additional penalties to each separate roll.
Even if the piece is out of range, the GM should let the Harrowed try to pick up a missing piece whenever he wants. The GM should make this roll secretly, though, so the player can’t figure out whether or not the piece is actually in range.
When tracking a piece, the Harrowed knows the direction of the piece and its range. This doesn’t tell him the quickest way to get to the piece, though. If it’s on the other side of the Great Salt Lake from him, he’s got some hiking or sailing to do, and if it’s on the wrong side of a mountain, it’s up to the Harrowed to find a pass.


Level 1: 1 piece, 1 mile
Level 2: 2 pieces, 10 miles
Level 3: 3 pieces, 100 miles
Level 4: 4 pieces, 1,000 miles
Level 5: 5 pieces, Anywhere on Earth


Level 1
Cost: 8 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Detect with numerous modifiers)

Level 2
Cost: 9 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Detect with numerous modifiers)

Level 3
Cost: 11 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Detect with numerous modifiers)

Level 4
Cost: 12 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Detect with numerous modifiers)

Level 5
Cost: 13 pts
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Detect with numerous modifiers)

Undead Contortion

Some living folks are surprisingly flexible. Some are double-jointed. Some can even lay their legs across their necks, turn their feet around backwards, and contort their arms in all sorts of unnatural-looking positions that you would think would hurt like Hell. Sometimes it might seem like these folks got some kind of rubber frame inside of them in place of their skeletons. But none of these living folks can hold a candle to someone who can snap their bones together so small they can slide under a jail door.
Undead contortion allows a Harrowed to dislocate pretty much any and every bone in her body, including shoulder blades, ribs, pelvis, and even the separate plates of the skull. In a really tight spot, a Harrowed with this power can even break and crush her own skeleton.
Such contortions aren’t without their price, however. In “normal” situations, the undead simply pops some bones out of their sockets. The damage this causes depends on the Harrowed’s power level. Where any resulting wounds are assigned is up to the GM, or rolled randomly.
The number of actions it takes to contort, as well as how long it takes to reassemble the body, also depends on the Harrowed’s power level.
While using the power in this way, the undead suffers a –4 modifier to all rolls involving physical traits.
The above contortions should get undead through most tight spots, usually up to about the width of his own skull. That’s the one bone a Harrowed doesn’t want to mess with if he can help it.
But he can’t always help it. If the Harrowed needs to get through a tighter spot, he’s going to have to crack his own noggin. When this situation arises, the contortionist can fit through incredibly tight spaces, down to about 3" in diameter (small enough to ooze down drainpipes, by the way).
This is fairly dangerous, however, as the damage from using the power increases by an extra 2d6, and any resulting wounds are applied to the noggin.
In this fractured state, the Harrowed must subtract –6 from any rolls involving physical traits.
As a final note concerning undead contortion, the popping and snapping sounds made by the undead’s joints while the power is being initiated or ended are fairly horrifying in themselves, but the end result is not at all pretty to look at either.
Most people are disturbed at the sight of a gal with her head all mushed flat and her shoulders and ribs folded down like the spines of an umbrella, sliding through an opening hardly big enough for a cat. This is at least an -4 penalty to a Fright Check for anyone that happens to stumble upon a Harrowed in this state, depending on the circumstances.


Level 1
Cost: 1 pt
Advantages:
Double-Jointed (Costs Hit Points – 5d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 5 seconds)
Stretching 1 (Costs Hit Points – 5d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 5 seconds)

Level 2
Cost: 3 pts
Advantages:
Double-Jointed (Costs Hit Points – 4d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 4 seconds)
Stretching 1 (Costs Hit Points – 4d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 4 seconds)

Level 3
Cost: 5 pts
Advantages:
Double-Jointed (Costs Hit Points – 3d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 3 seconds)
Stretching 1 (Costs Hit Points – 3d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 3 seconds)

Level 4
Cost: 7 pts
Advantages:
Double-Jointed (Costs Hit Points – 2d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 2 seconds)
Stretching 1 (Costs Hit Points – 2d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 2 seconds)

Level 5
Cost: 16 pts
Advantages:
Double-Jointed (Costs Hit Points – 1d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 1 second)
Stretching 1 (Costs Hit Points – 1d6, Link, Takes Extra Time 1 second)

Unholy Host

You already know that sometimes folks come back from the dead. What you might not know is that a special few of them have been known to bring along a few of their old companions with them.
And these folks were once dead too.
The only problem is that the undead cohorts following the Harrowed about aren’t Harrowed themselves. They’re just plain old walkin’ dead looking to make trouble in the world of mortals the best they can.
The walkin’ dead are ruthless and unwavering allies, but they’re also evil incarnate. They can cause a hero far more trouble than they’re worth if he doesn’t keep his glazed eyes on them every second. And they’ll certainly do so given an ice cube’s chance in Death Valley.
The hero doesn’t have a mental link with his host, but when he gives them orders, they are bound to follow them. Walkin’ dead are clever in their interpretations, however. Give them an inch, and they’ll leave a slew of bloody corpses for a mile.
Think of them as devious children interpreting their orders in the most literal and harmful way possible.
Other than that, they’re completely loyal, and won’t let their champion die if they can help it. They might let him suffer and may get a good laugh out of it, but if the hero ever dies, they die too.
The level of the Harrowed’s power determines how large his host can become. These zombies don’t just appear, they have to be raised. Just how most Harrowed raise their host seems to vary. Some give them a kiss of life. Others simply open a coffin and say “get up.” Regardless, it takes about 5 minutes to get the corpse up and moving.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Unholy Reflexes

When lead starts flying, most people can’t help but flinch. It takes a body a moment to react to trouble when it starts, even when you’ve seen it brewing. Adrenaline starts pumping through your veins, and your heart starts thumping loud enough to keep time with the piano player. Basically, you’re just a palpitating wreck.
But the Harrowed don’t have as much to lose as the living, so they don’t hesitate as much. When you know you can survive just about everything that can be thrown at you, you can face danger a bit more calmly. That’s especially true of Harrowed with the unholy reflexes power.
A Harrowed with this power can squeeze extra actions into a combat round. The level of the power determines how many extra actions the Harrowed can get.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Varmint Control

Normally, animals are instinctively spooked by the walking dead, but manitous come from the Hunting Grounds, where the animal spirits themselves dwell. In the course of their long existences, some manitous have learned a few tricks from the animal spirits and can control their flesh-and-blood kin on earth.
A Harrowed with this power is able to manipulate lower creatures by thought.
The animals must be within the Harrowed’s sight for the command to be given and maintained. Only simple commands can be conveyed, things that could be expressed as a simple sentence, though the Harrowed need not actually speak. Examples might include: “Attack that person,” or “Eat that person,” or “Break that window.” The varmints interpret the command as best they can and set to work.
The Harrowed can do nothing else while maintaining control, and as soon as his concentration is released, the control over the creature ends.
At lower levels, the power is limited to control of simple creatures like worms and insects, although it affects a mass of them rather than a single one. Of course, while being the target of a mass of worms commanded to eat you might be horrifying, it won’t really do any damage—unless you’re trapped or tied up and can’t get away.
Higher levels allow the control of larger creatures, though usually only a single beast at a time. The exception is when an undead uses the power at a level below his maximum. For each level lower, he can control twice as many creatures. An undead with varmint control at level 5, for instance, could choose to control any of the following: one grizzly, two horses, up to four wolves, up to eight house cats, or up to 16 different swarms of bugs and worms. The same command must be given to all the creatures controlled at one time.
In any case, the power never affects creatures created by the Reckoners. Mojave rattlers and the like have no animal spirits roaming the Hunting Grounds from which the manitous could have learned their insidious tricks.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Voice o’ the Damned

A dead man’s cackle is an eerie thing. Sometimes it sounds like wind rustling through dead leaves. Other times it is the inane babbling of a brook cold as the grave. In the end, it is always tainted with madness born of the manitou within.
This maddening power is a simple but powerful enhancement of any being’s ability to taunt and intimidate their foes into cowering submission.
If the Harrowed beats his opponent in a simple contest of Will, the foe is automatically unnerved, distracted, or broken, depending on the Harrowed’s power level.


Level 1, Unnerved: Your character’s stern gaze or cruel taunt angers or upsets your opponent. The target suffers –4 to her next action or roll. This includes any “passive” defense or actions like their Perception or resisting further tests of wills.
Level 2, Quite Unnerved: Your character’s stern gaze or cruel taunt angers or upsets your opponent. The target suffers –4 for the next round. This includes any “passive” defense or actions like their Perception or resisting further tests of wills.
Level 3, Distracted: The target is totally distracted by your hero’s jibe, trick, or surly stare. The target loses her next action and is unnerved (as above) for her next round and the round thereafter.
Level 4, Very Distracted: The target is totally distracted by your hero’s jibe, trick, or surly stare. The target loses her next two actions and is unnerved (as above) for her next round and the two rounds thereafter.
Level 5, Broken: You’ve broken the bad guy’s will — for the moment at least. He’s distracted for 2 rounds and unnerved for two additional rounds. Most villains start thinking about escape at this point, but particulars are up to the GM and the situation.


Cost: 5 pts / Level
Advantages:
Custom made (based on Rapier Wit with numerous modifiers)

Wither

An undead with this power can accelerate the aging process by his mere touch, weakening or even wounding a victim. To initiate the power, the character must grasp the target’s bare flesh (usually a hand or arm), which requires a successful grapple check or unarmed attack roll.
As his next action, the undead inflicts damage to the location being grasped. The Harrowed’s Will determines the damage for the Wither attack, and the target suffers unarmed damage as well, as with any normal attack.
At higher levels of the power, the undead’s damage rating with this power increases. Naturally, then, a Harrowed with five levels of this power can put some serious hurting on his victim.
This power can also be used on inanimate objects to make them age prematurely. Depending on the material being affected, the effects can range from rust to wither to rot or nothing really noticeable. To age something in this way requires 1 action.
It’s up to the GM exactly how this power affects something it’s applied to. It can easily be used to curdle milk or rot apples, but it likely only makes wood more brittle, rusts steel, or tarnishes silver.
Wither does not age living creatures directly. It can only affect an amount of material that can be enclosed in the Harrowed’s hand. Because of this, it could never work on an entire human being.
The power could be used on tiny creatures like mice to wither them to death. While this might not do a lot to directly affect an opponent, it can sure go a long way toward putting a solid scare in him. Anyone witnessing something like this is probably in line for a fright check.


Cost: NA
Advantages:
Not implemented; if desired, let Tom know and he will implement it in the GDF

Harrowed Powers

GURPS Storage Sandbox Belrathius